Islamic centre condemns march on Wootton Bassett

Media Coverage

FOREST Gate's Minhaj-ul-Quran International UK centre today says it "strongly condemns" the planned march by an "extremist group" at Wootton Bassett whose town folk who have turned out in their hundreds to honour fallen British servicemen as their coffins arrive from Iraq and Afghanistan. Minhaj-ul-Quran, based on Romford Road, whose stated vision is to promote religious moderation, peace, love, harmony and modern Islamic sciences pays tribute to the dead British soldiers. Spokesperson Shahid Mursaleen said he urges Prime Minister Gordon Brown to take "necessary steps" to ban the protest march "as it will only create trouble and fuel hate crime against innocent law abiding British Muslims" and put the leaders under house-arrest.

FOREST Gate's Minhaj-ul-Quran International UK centre today says it "strongly condemns" the planned march by an "extremist group" at Wootton Bassett whose town folk who have turned out in their hundreds to honour fallen British servicemen as their coffins arrive from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Minhaj-ul-Quran, based on Romford Road, whose stated vision is to promote religious moderation, peace, love, harmony and modern Islamic sciences pays tribute to the dead British soldiers. Spokesperson Shahid Mursaleen said he urges Prime Minister Gordon Brown to take "necessary steps" to ban the protest march "as it will only create trouble and fuel hate crime against innocent law abiding British Muslims" and put the leaders under house-arrest. He added: "The Government must ensure that the law-abiding British Muslim youth do not fall prey to such extremists." Mursaleem added: "Extremists like Anjem Choudary abuse the freedom of speech Britain is giving to its people and insult the British public." The general consensus among British Muslims is that "extremists" like Choudary do not speak "on our behalf" while leaving the population to wonder why such people "have a free licence to stir up hatred against innocent law abiding British Muslims." Minhaj-ul-Quran International UK will host a seminar in Parliament this week to discuss "the reasons why extremist and radical elements" exist in Britain and how they can be tackled "A series of lectures for British youth is also being held at Queen Mary, University of London. * Founded in 1981, Minhaj-ul-Quran International launched in east London in 1994 and now boasts 10 UK centres from Glasgow to London with more than 5,000 regular members along with outlets in more than 90 countries. Since then Minhaj-ul-Quran UK has opened 10 centres serving all parts of the country from Glasgow to London and has more than 5000 regular members.